Add some colour to your tent

Don’t Forget a Thing! Packing List For Camping With Your Kids

Add some colour to your tentI’m just back from my first ever camping trip and first ever family music festival, so being addicted to lists I thought I would share and share alike!

I promise you won’t get such a comprehensive list elsewhere because:

(a) I’m a bit wacky and love a bit of glamping and

(b) I’m retentive about lists.

I’ve highlighted the MUST HAVEs for you!

If you haven’t been to a festival with the kids yet, check out my post on why family festivals are a great adventure to try out with the kids and my review of the fabulously muddy Penn Festival and last years Just So.

 

Clothes

Check out my tips on what to wear to a festival, plus my Pinterest board with more ideas and links to the clothes.

Wellies (there are some lovely ones on my Pinterest board)

Crocs (don’t use if very muddy, they’re feet will be a terrible mess!)

Daps if it’s not muddy (There’s some cute daps on this Pinterest board of mine)

Fleeces – were brilliant for me and the kids (I’ve now bought an extra one, so that I’ve got daytime and nighttime ones!)

PJ’s – take extra incase of trouble for the kids (mine are fleecy Joe Browns ones)

Water proof coats and trousers – I don’t wear the trousers (yuk!), but they were a must for the kids and the hairy one.  The macs need to be those pack-a-mac ones for lightness (try to get a prettier one if you can)

Wooly hats – for kids in evenings

Pashmina Scarf – for me (I don’t go anywhere without them)

Socks, Knickers, Bras – just incase you forget

Wings, Tutu’s and wands for Little Dimples

Fancy Dress For Curly Headed boy

Poncho Towels x 2 for the kids for after a shower

Nappies, wipes and bags

Outfits for each day plus spare leggings/tracksuit bottoms

 

Bedrooms

Hotwater bottles for me and the kids – OMG so glad I had these as I’m a wimp!

Pillows for me – yep wimp again.

Those cuddly teddy bear pillow for the kids – make great teddies and travel companions too.

Sleeping bags – a double for me and Little Dimples, Moshi Monster one for Curly Headed Boy and ‘proper’ one for the hairy northerner

Double blow up bed (and pump) – for the girls

Sleeping Mats – thick mat for the little boy and thin mat for the ‘hard’ one

Blankets x 4 – 1 under me, 2 on top of me and 1 more for Curly Headed Boy

Bed Bumpers – so that little dimples doesn’t roll into the tent side (she doesn’t like it)

Towels x 4 – can’t have enough towels

Microfibre hair turban if your hair takes a while to dry (£1 from Wilkinsons or a pound shop)

Festival

Rucksacks – for each of us, don’t use over the shoulder bags, and if you can get oilcloth washables one for you, they will be the easiest to clean afterwards.

Ear Defenders for kids

iPads and iPhones with films on for packing and unpacking

Power monkey to charge up iPads and iPhones – AMAZING!

Radio Flyer – perfect for carrying two kids, sleeping babies, lugging stuff from the car, and getting through mud. (some places you can rent them)

Games

2 books of drawing/sticker activities

Lego book for son, Duplo for daughter

Football – didn’t take it, will do next time as it is much more sensible than a frisbee

Books – thin ones that work for both kids (Gruffalo!)

Bananagrams game

Some little characters to play with e.g. Mini mouse plastic tiny travel house for Little Dimples, and Octonaughts submarine for Curly Headed Boy

 

Camping Stuff

Here’s my pinterest board for camping/glamping stuff.

Bog in a Bag – OMG you HAVE TO HAVE one of these – no long trip to the loo overnight or panic when it’s pissing it down! (there are a few left here to buy!)

Bunting and solar fairy lights – 2 lots – VERY important!

Tent – check out my review of the Vango Airbeam  Tent

Mallet – for the tent.

Pop up tent – we have a little one that is useful sometimes for at the festival or keeping things in outside our tent if we don’t take an awning.

Pink whistling kettle – obviously!

Enamel Tea Pot – Keep Calm and drink tea from John Lewis – tea is obviously a necessity!

Enamel Plates and Bowels – pretty ones with bunting on from John Lewis – I was disappointed that the edges seem a little dodgy.  You can buy the blue ones from the pound shops.

Cuttlery – we had plastic, but it was horrid.

Cooking spoon – get a metal one, we melted the plastic one!

Saucepan and frying pan – doesn’t need to be big, just enough for a whole meal for the family.

Front door mat – WOW this was useful – I’d bring two next time one for inside and one for outside

Wind break, HUGE picnic blanket and cushions from GLTC – gorgeous and made it feel really homey.  Would have been wonderful if it was sunny.  But didn’t wash very well :o(

Picnic basket and cool box – we didn’t really use this as we decided not to take lunch with us, but we will use it at the Just So festival and our holiday in Siblu (french caravan park).

Cooker with 2 hobs and under toaster (plus canister) – great for tea, a full english breakfast and making dinner on the night we arrived.

Collapsible water bottle – a must have

Collapsible washing up bowl – so useful for feet, washing up and catching drips from wet clothes!

Oven gloves – get thinner light ones as the lids are small

Light cutting mats for cutting up things to cook on.

Knife with cover.

Tea towel – we forgot!

Dustpan and brush – definitely needed on longer trip.

Kitchen cooker table – was very wobbly, I wasn’t sure that it would stay straight.  Not needed for a festival (just cook on the ground), but good for a longer trip as long as you buy boxes to store stuff underneath.

Table and Chairs – This one from Cotswold is very easy to transport, but a little wobbly with little kids and takes up lots of room.  I don’t think you need it for a festival, just for camping longer than a weekend.

Cheap Plastic backed picnic blanket – was a god send outside the front door.

Wind up Lamp, plus two little ones for the kids (head torches are great too)

Something to hang up wet stuff with – a washing line or I got a pink plastic oval thingy with pegs on it that I could hang from something

General kitchen supplies

LOADS of black bags

LOADS of antibacterial wipes

LOADs of baby wipes

LOADS of kitchen roll

LOADS of Loo roll

LOADs of little packs of tissues

Matches

Little travel bottle with washing up liquid

Newspaper can be great outside the front door if it gets muddy (or straw as we had)

Dish cloths

Toiletries

EAR PLUGS – (Reminded by a lovely commenter!) – I use the blue waxy ones from Boots, not the yellow foam ones or the plastic ones.

Eye masks – you know the ones you get on a plane – can be useful because it gets so light in a tent in the mornings!

Wipes to wash face and take off make up

Travel bottles with shampoo and conditioner.  (I can’t travel without mousse either).

Moisturiser

Deodorant

Toothbrushes and toothpaste

Makeup.

Tampons and pads – if there is a chance your period is going to come while you are away, you so know it will!

First Aid – Plasters, Suntan Lotion, Sudocrem, Thermometer, Calpol, Aloe Vera (after sun and good for bites)

Food

Note: Remember not to take glass bottles to a camp site or festival.
Most important – Tea (or coffee), milk (take 2 x 1 litre and have one of them frozen), Orange juice, apple juice (take a frozen one), squash in a plastic bottle
Alcohol – now at the penn festival you couldn’t take alcohol on site, so the best bet would have been cans of cider or gin in a tin.  But at Just So last year we spent some time at the tent in the evening, so a box of wine is a good plan.  (Be considerate if you get drunk please!).
Fruit – last year I felt a bit unwell after going to Just So because my body is fussy and likes it’s fruit and veg.  So definitely take grapes, apples, satsumas, those innocent fruit drinks for the kids, and some extra veg for the adults for the first night’s dinner.
Snacks – will be expensive so add some high sugar but healthy emergency rations: bear fruit, yogurt covered raisins/strawberry flakes, sesame seed snaps etc.  Plus late at night the kids might be snackish, so some crackers are a good idea.
Breakfast:
  • Cereal – those little travel boxes of cereal are great if you aren’t taking bowls.  But they caused arguments between the kids as they don’t have equal numbers of types of cereal.  So I’m going to pick one type and put in a plastic box next time.
  • Toast – nice and easy and a good back up to have a loaf of bread with butter and marmite
  • Brioche – can make a lovely breakfast or snack later
Lunch/Brunch
  • Eggs, Bacon, Sausages, Tomatoes – we had a full english breakfast because the Penn Festival didn’t start until 12, so didn’t need to take a picnic lunch with us.  Whereas the Just So festival starts really early, so there will be no time for this.
  • Baps, cheese, crisps – when we go to Just So it starts earlier so we will take lunch with us.
Dinner – on the evening of arrival and last night – but don’t bother during the festival.
    • 2 cold cooked chicken breasts chopped up added to fresh pasta (quicker to cook).  Add pesto and a big tin of sweetcorn.
    • Tins of tuna heated up with some philidelphia and milk to make a sauce and big tin of sweetcorn with pasta or noodles
    • Tins of spagetti bolognaise on toast with big tin of sweetcorn
    • Tins of tomato soup, big bread, cucumber and carrots
    • Hotdogs (but my hubby is allergic to celery, so they don’t work for us)
    • I was tempted to introduce the kids to spam and corned beef!
    • Remember you can get tinned potatoes, which would be quicker to cook than normal ones.

 

 

What do you think of my tips and list?  Let me know if you use it and if there’s anything to add.  Also feel free to add your own lists in the comments!

Glamping an Vango Tent

The Perfect Tent For First Timers and Family Festival Goers

Ok I admit it, the Big hairy northern one was right!

It might not happen often, but his tendency to want to spend the spangdoolies was correct this time.

A few weeks ago he had a big panic about our tent and said he wanted to go back and look at the Vango Airbeam; basically a tent that blows up in 5 minutes.

Although it was to be our first time camping, I was pretty sure that it was going to be something that I would want to do again, so I agreed on the proviso that he got a smallish one and off he happily went to buy one.

It was such a good plan.  We had picked the worst weekend ever to try our first attempt at camping at our first attempt at a music festival, so there was no panic on getting the tent up in the rain as it literally does go up in 5 mins!  Plus we made a fast exit on the sunday due to the potential for getting ‘mudded’ in and the packing up took long enough; if we had added another 1.5hrs on top of that it would have been a nightmare.

Here is the video of him putting it up for only the second time; pretty cool heh!

 

 

This tent has two sleeping compartments, but we took down the separator as it was easier to just all sleep together.  There was plenty of room for the beds and our bags with clothes in them.

I would say that for a family of 4 it’s an OK size, unless you have loads of stuff like tables and chairs that have to fit in as well due to it raining outside.  So we are investing in a porch, ground sheet and also carpet for the section next to the bed rooms.  But if you are travelling a little lighter than we were it would be perfect for a short camping trip or a festival.

It also handled the rain and mud with no problem and no leaks.

 

 

Side View Of Vango Airbeam

The reason I hadn’t been keen initially is because I wanted somewhere to sit outside or feel like you were sitting outside and because it angles outwards it doesn’t give that feeling.  However we found that with two extra poles we could put the front door up and make a little place to sit under, which would be great in normal or slightly damp evenings (not when pissing down though!).

The only other problem is because of this angling outwards for all the doors (front and side), you have to quickly shut them if it rains, as obviously otherwise the floor gets wet.


 

Glamping an Vango Tent

 

One downside for me is that it’s also a disgusting colour; why oh why do tent makers think that we want to have a yukky green tent?  Adding bunting and some fairy lights did help though!

It’s quite expensive, you can definitely get a cheaper tent.  But it’s the same price as we would have spent on one yurt, and with this tent we are going to two festivals, and I’m definitely planning on going full on camping in it as well. (It was the Kinetic 500 which could sleep 5 (£600), but they do have bigger and smaller versions).

 

Have you had any tent nightmares you’d like to share or got a fab tent you would like to let everyone know about?

 

Disclosure: No one paid me or gave me anything for this review (but I’m always open to offers ;o) 

Kids love muddy festivals

How fun Mudfest at Penn Festival was: I’m a ‘proper’ festival goer now!

I realise now that I’ve often looked on wistfully at images of Glastonbury wondering why I’d never been to a music festival and experienced the whole ‘vibe’ of camping, wellies and getting covered in mud.

Well I need wist no more!  I’m now officially a ‘proper’ music festival camper having just got back from Penn Festival 2012; a mudfest with a wonderful vibe and great music.

 

I have therefore proved to everyone that I’m totally capable of camping, as long as I can make it all look pretty with a bit of glamp style and that mud doesn’t phase me at all.

 

Add some colour to your tent
Add a bit of colour & cosiness to a tent

It all looked like it was going to go badly wrong when I got a text from the lovely Romany at Festivalkidz to tell me to not set off yet.  Problem was I was already half-way there!  The local cricket club weren’t willing to help out with their hard-standing parking (boo), and people were already getting stuck in the mud.  However they decided to go ahead, and I think it was the right decision.  They showed a load of determination and in return the vibe of those of us who made it and braved the difficulties in getting there had a great spirit.

people covered in mud at music festival
Crazy people embracing the mud!

I know it might sound a bit mean, but I think that considering the Isle of Wight festival a few weeks beforehand, there could have been a more concrete contingency plan in place.  That way it would have gone into action more easily.  For instance they would have known on the friday that only campers and artists/stalls were going to be let on and had the press about the buses/coaches picking up day ticketers sorted straight away.  There would have been more wood/straw/grasscrete to get those of us in and out, and more clarity on when the farmer was or was not going to be there.  However, realistically this was only their second year, so it’s just a little bit of inexperience and I really hope that they didn’t lose too much money and get to put it on again to resounding sunshine next year.

Snap At Penn Festival
Dancing to Snap!

On the VERY big upside the music was INCREDIBLE.  All the bands were good and in tune (unlike on the TV), even the terrified girl band I saw first of all in a tent.  Standing out particularly were Vanquish who I don’t doubt we’ll see in the Pop scene very soon.  I didn’t get to see all the bands that I really wanted to because with two little kids it was a bit tricky to traipse from the tent to the main stage each time an act finished.  So instead we waited at the main stage and were rewarded by amazing performances from Rozalla and Snap!  I was a fan, but not a big fan of their music in the eighties; I was more of a modern romantic kind of girl.  But live they were incredible!  You could see how great they were by the effect on the kids, because they may have never heard them before but both of them were up and dancing.

Kids love muddy festivals
Mud is a kids activity in itself!

They also had some lovely stalls, with no duplicates which was great.  The only thing that I’m not keen on is lots of activities for kids that are what I call ‘easy’ and ‘insubstantial’ fun, that cost money; so we spent a lot of time being nagged for another ride on the bumper cars, or fair ground ride etc etc.  There was a big top with circus performers, but it didn’t quite work for our 6yo because when he went it was all older kids, and he felt left out; you know what a 6yo’s attention span can be like.  But we spent a lot of time chilling out in front of Festival Kidz tent, while I swapped philosophy with the other stall holders, so thank you to Romany for that quiet space.

Pop Up Tent eating pizza
She wanted the other bit of Pizza!

The food was fab.  The big hairy northern one and I had a curry from Malik’s, which was just gorgeous.  Sadly the kids wanted Pizza which took 40mins, and the noodle people hadn’t made it; understandable that they couldn’t get a full range of food in due to the mud.  We took a little pop up tent just in case which was brilliant, and meant that when it rained heavily the kids could go in it, they ate their pizza in it, and I breastfed Little Dimples in there.

It felt as though there was a slight confusion about the festival.  Was it a ‘family festival’?  Or was it for party goers, as there was a Wedding reception and hen party, plus big groups of young people?  It said in the pamphlet that the aim was to enable kids and adults to enjoy themselves.  But it didn’t quite get the balance right for me.

Mrs Connor Getting Married At Penn Festival
Congratulations to the new Mrs Cooper!

Maybe that’s because I have a young family, but the camp site didn’t work.  There was meant to be a ‘family’ side and a noisier side.  But it wasn’t marked and it wasn’t policed by the stewards.  On the friday night I went to complain to the circle of tents behind us who had put an awning in between them, but they just thought I was being grumpy and wanting to stop their ‘fun’.  You’d have thought that families with older kids would remember what it’s like to have younger kids, but NO.  So I didn’t sleep at all on friday night, which was horrible, especially as the showers didn’t start until too late at mid-day.  On saturday night I went to ask for help from the stewards, but their response was that the noise had calmed down by 4am the night before.  EXCUSE ME but I have kids who wake up at 5am, you plonker!  Luckily the family of tents had clearly partied themselves out the night before and ironically the group of young guys from ‘Phantom Light‘ I talked to were really sympathetic; so I did get some sleep in the end.

Tractor pulling festival goers
Mr Saviour - the farmer and his tractor

On sunday morning we eventually made the terribly sad decision to go home.  The farmer was there with his tractor and we couldn’t be sure he would be back.  If I’d been sure he would be back on monday morning I would have waited and seen The Beat and Altered Images.  Instead we came home and started the mammoth job of de-muddifying everything.

Clothes covered in mud
Rounds 1-3 of many more loads

 

So my verdict is:

Out of 10 – 7/10

Would I go again – Totally

Music – Amazing quality of all bands, incredible energy of headliners!

Mud – not a problem, the kids loved it

Camping – Wasn’t clearly signposted and very noisy.  Top tip: camp right over by a far edge/fence if you go to one this year without different areas.  The good thing is that it was close to the festival site, and parking, so if they are in the same place next year, it’s very convenient.

Poshwash showers – I would have loved to try, but they started up too late on the saturday, and we left on the sunday.

Food – dinner was great (pizza and indian), I didn’t go for the £5 breakfast as it seemed a bit steep, but then saw a £3 option

Social Media – they used Facebook and twitter to keep us up to date, I think this could be done even more and is a great idea

Stuff for kids – pretty good, probably just limited by the mud.  However the mud was an activity in itself!

Contingency planning & Logistics – I’m sure this will be improved next year with more experience.

Determination – I would definitely give them 10/10 for determination for keeping the festival going, well done guys!

Disclosure: I got a family camping ticket in return for reviewing the festival.  Thank you very much to Penn Festival for inviting me, I really hope you invite me back next year so that I can give you 10/10!

A Blast From The Past To Get You Up Dancing: Penn Festival

I’m EXCITED.

You might have noticed that after my ‘why family festivals are fab‘ post and ‘what to wear to a family festival‘.

It’s quite likely I could become a bit of a festival bore!  Nah, you love me anyway don’t you?

(If you are actually loving it, make sure you keep an eye on the sidebar  of my blog or Facebook page over the weekend: I’m going to be posting loads of photos and hopefully a couple of funny videos!)

It’s potentially a bit daft getting excited about camping with two young kids in the rain and dealing with big melt downs when I really want to be listening to some music.  However, I’m going to chill, not worry about getting wet/cold (I have hot water bottles!), and hope that the music will heal all ills!  (Plus I have a big box of wine, which will work if nothing else does!).

So I thought I’d share with you some of the line up for this weekend’s Penn Festival (BTW Friday night is FREE – so come on down!).

I bet it’s going to bring back some memories and get you jigging this wet friday morning!

 

First off the fabulous ‘Soul to Soul’ (I could never work out how many were dancers and how many were actually singing in this video!)

 

SNAP! were apparently brilliant and I’m really looking forward to seeing them:

 

Hows about a bit of SKA from The Beat (Curly Headed Boy is going to love these guys)?

 

A classic is Rozalla’s ‘Everybody’s free’

 

Or a bit more chilled is ‘The real thing’

 

And not one could forget ‘Altered Images’

 

Check out Penn’s Facebook page to see some of the other bands who might be less well known, but sound fab.

 

Are you going too?  I’d love to hear from you if you are; say hi on twitter!

 

 

 

 

 

Family Festivals are fun to dress for

What To Wear To A Family Festival?

You’re packing the picnic basket, ear defenders for the kids and maybe even the tent if you are brave like us.

Perhaps you were inspired by my post on why family festivals are great?

But what’s worrying you is ‘OMG what am I going to wear to a family festival?

It’s not exactly glastonbury, and you probably don’t want to wear teeny shorts any more, but if you go in plain old boring stuff you might feel just as odd.

Here are my rules:

1) Colour is a must, but pick one that will mix and match for the whole weekend and NO white!

2) Flat shoes only! Wellies, Crocs, daps or pumps

3) Leggings or Skinny jeans (don’t get messy in the mud)

4) Lots of thin layers: vests, tunics, cardigans, coats, pashminas etc

5) Dress for summer and winter and wet weather: sun tan lotion, hats, water proofs and jumpers!

6) Pack wooly hats for the kids in the evenings to keep warm

7) Consider flower garlands, feather boa, wings, and face paint if you are feeling brave!

Last year I rocked the flower garland, feather boa, sparkly fit flops, gypsy shirt and short skirt + leggings combo, and my mate looked fab in cropped jeans, daps and a pretty skirt:

What I wore to a family festival

 

This year I’m planning on wearing this to the Penn Festival (Buckinghamshire) this weekend and probably again for the Just So Festival (Staffordshire) in august.

What to wear to festivals

The ‘luscious’ navy leggings, stripy top and pretty red flowy top are from Joe Browns.

The blue and red (I’m being brave this year) skinny jeans, with the two tunics are from Next.

What shoes and coats to wear to family festivals

 

The cropped jacket is gorgeous and is from Joe browns again.

The blue mac is from New Look (not sure if it is still available)

The blue cardigan, wellies, daps (I’ve actually got the non-ankle version) and bag are from Next.

The crocs (mine are pink) are from crocs obviously; I’ve always been a hater of crocs, but I have to admit these peep toes work (I was given them for winning a Brilliance in blogging award).

UPDATE: I’ve added a blue hoody with a zip and fleecy lining in a bigger size as I’m a bit worried about the weather!!!

 

Don’t like those?  There are loads more ideas for you on my Pinterest boards:

 

This is what the Little Dimples wore last year to Just So:

Family Festivals are fun to dress for

 

I was moaning that Next had let me down and there were no tutu’s this year when the Fairy Glass guys (the guys who I bought the pink wings from at Just So) offered to send her some new wings and tutu for this year (the blurring is her waving her matching wand – see it’s proper magic!):

 

Wear Fairy wings to festivals

 

Have you got any tips for what to wear?  I’d love to know?

Feel free to add links to your posts or Pinterest boards!

Or what about what NOT to wear?

 

p.s. I wasn’t given anything to mention these clothes in this post, but I have been given tickets to the festivals and the tutu and wings for Little Dimples

Family Festivals

Have you thought of going to a Family Festival this summer?

Family FestivalsI know many of you won’t be even considering the hundreds/thousands of pounds that it costs to go on holiday this summer.

You might also be struggling to take 7-14 days off work.

I’ve got a great alternative for you …

Hows about thinking about a Family Festival instead?

 

If you’ve never been to a festival before, it’s a great way to start.

If you went to festivals before having kids, why stop now?

 

A ‘Family Festival’ can mean lots of things, but basically it means that there will be music, but kids are expected and catered for.  Some are more ‘family’ than others.

I had the idea of going to a Family Festival last year because I’d never been to a festival before, so I thought maybe if we start now with the kids, they’ll invite us along with them to Glastonbury when they are teenagers!

We went in a yurt glamping, but this year we are going to try camping for the first time with a glamping twist (think bunting, and pretty colours!).  You can also just go for the day, or stay in a local B&B if you don’t fancy getting in touch with nature though.

To be fair to people who used to go to festivals when they were younger, it’s not going to be the same; getting drunk just isn’t practical when you have little ones to watch and lots of people around you.  The good news is that kids don’t mind mud and love tents, so as long as you are willing to compromise a bit, I reckon a family festival will be every bit as good as the ones that you used to go to.

We went to ‘Just So’ in Staffordshire in august and it was A.M.A.Z.I.N.G full of magic and imagination (here’s my review), with some great music in the evening.  Curly headed boy said that the 3 days felt like 10; so you see it is the perfect alternative to a holiday.  Apparently according to the stall holders who go to loads of festivals we were lucky to get the right one first time round, because it is definitely the best from a fun, safe and family perspective (i.e. it’s not about getting drunk or taking ‘other’ substances).  Luckily for me they’ve invited us back this year, but even if they hadn’t we would sooooo be going.    If you are a first timer and love magical things, then this is definitely the right festival for you, I’ve just checked their website and it’s looking even better this year.  We took a radio flyer, but this year you can rent them (brilliant idea), my favourite singer JonPaul Palombo is back in the acoustic tent, and it looks like it’s packed with the same sort of simple, slightly naive, and really funny things for the children to do.

This year we have also been invited to try out the Penn Festival in a couple of weeks, which is much nearer us in Buckinghamshire.  It’s much more of a music festival, with an eighties vibe, so perfect for me and the Northern one’s music tastes; I’m looking forward to Snap, Altered Images and The Beat most of all.  It sounds like it started out as a local thing and has expanded from there, so I’m really looking forward to seeing what it’s like.  It’ll be our first long weekend camping as well; lets hope this rainy weather isn’t all summer.  I’ll let you know how it goes!

If you can’t make it to Penn or Just So, never fear!  Check out these two sites for ideas on where to go:

Festival Kidz

Festivals for All.

 

Here are my 10 top tips for picking a Family Festival:

1) If you don’t want the extra cost of accommodation, choose somewhere nearby and pick one with entrance for just a day.

2) If you fancy staying over, there are always B&B’s or you can camp (tips on camping coming soon).

3) If you have a bit more money then go for a Yurt or a Bell tent already put up for you.

4) If your kids are young, find smaller family festivals, rather than the bigger obvious ones like Lollibop (London) or Camp Bestival (Dorset).

5) Check what is included, because the last thing you want to do is pay and then have to pay for the activities as well.

6) Check the reviews and avoid the ones where it is more about the stalls and selling of ‘stuff’.

7) Take snacks and water, because food will be expensive if you have to buy every meal.

8) Extend the trip by a couple of days and turn it into a weeks holiday to combine two things into one.

9) Safety is paramount – have some kind of sign/agreement to work out which adult is on watch at any one time, don’t just assume and make sure the kids have your mobile no on them.

10) Prams and pushchairs may not be viable.  Slings, backpacks and radio flyers work well.

 

I hope I’ve convinced you to try out a family festival this year and you have as much fun as we will.

I’m going to write a post with tips for what to wear to a festival, so don’t worry about that bit, plus some tips for first time campers like us.

I’d love your tips for festivals or links to places that you have been.  Feel free to add a blog post to your review if you’ve written one.

I’m just hoping that the weather improves; but I’m sure that we’ll get into the spirit of it all anyway!